The Real Criminals in the Tarek Mehanna case

3

29/06/2012 by Siddiqui Fayesal

This is an article from the magazine “Young Muslim Magazine” of which I am a subscriber since the past 4-5 years. I don’t know why I never thought of posting these articles before. But this May’s article on Human Rights gave me the feeling that if I didn’t do this I’d be ashamed of myself. I will be starting another category altogether for things like these. This is nothing new that I will be posting and neither will this be the end of the American Propagandist ideals. The Zionist ideals and the Israel’s Illegal occupation of Palestine is just the prologue of more pathetic (if that were possible) things to come!

Read on and understand not only the few lines but also what it portends.

The Original Article is written by Glenn Greenwald

In one of the most egregious violations of the First Amendment’s guarantee of free speech seen in quite some time, Tarek Mehanna, an American Muslim, was convicted this week in a federal court in Boston and then sentenced yesterday to 17 years in prison. He was found guilty of supporting Al Qaeda (by virtue of translating Terrorists’ documents into English and expressing “sympathetic views” to the group) as well as conspiring to “murder” U.S. soldiers in Iraq (i.e., to wage war against an invading army perpetrating an aggressive attack on a Muslim nation). I’m still traveling and don’t have much time today to write about the case itself — Adam Serwer several months ago wrote an excellent summary of why the prosecution of Mehanna is such an odious threat to free speech and more background on the case is here, and I’ve written before about the growing criminalization of free speech under the Bush and Obama DOJs, whereby Muslims are prosecuted for their plainly protected political views — but I urge everyone to read something quite amazing: Mehanna’s incredibly eloquent, thoughtful statement at his sentencing hearing, before being given a 17-year prison term.

At some point in the future, I believe history will be quite clear about who the actual criminals are in this case: not Mehanna, but rather the architects of the policies he felt compelled to battle and the entities that have conspired to consign him to a cage for two decades:

TAREK’S SENTENCING STATEMENT
APRIL 12, 2012

Read to Judge O’Toole during his sentencing, April 12th 2012.

In the name of God the most gracious the most merciful Exactly four years ago this month I was finishing my work shift at alocal hospital. As I was walking to my car I was approached by two federal agents. They said that I had a choice to make: I could do things the easy way, or I could do them the hard way. The “easy ” way, as they explained, was that I would become an informant for the government, and if I did so I would never see the inside of a courtroom or a prison cell. As for the hard way, this is it. Here I am, having spent the majority of the four years since then in a solitary cell the size of a small closet, in which I am locked down for 23 hours each day. The FBI and these prosecutors worked very hard-and the government spent millions of tax dollars – to put me in that cell, keep me there, put me on trial, and finally to have me stand here before you today to be sentenced to even more time in a cell.

In the weeks leading up to this moment, many people have offered suggestions as to what I should say to you. Some said I should plead for mercy in hopes of a light sentence, while others suggested I would be hit hard either way. But what I want to do is just talk about myself for a few minutes.

When I refused to become an informant, the government responded by charging me with the “crime” of supporting the mujahideen fighting the occupation of Muslim countries around the world. Or as they like to call them, “terrorists.” I wasn’t born in a Muslim country, though. I was born and raised right here in America and this angers many people: how is it that I can be an American and believe the things I believe, take the positions I take? Everything a man is exposed to in his environment becomes an ingredient that shapes his outlook, and I’m no different.  So, in more ways than one, it’s because of America that I am who I am.

When I was six, I began putting together a massive collection of comic books. Batman implanted a concept in my mind, introduced me to a paradigm as to how the world is set up: that there are oppressors, there are the oppressed, and there are those who step up to defend the oppressed. This resonated with me so much that throughout the rest of my childhood, I gravitated towards any book that reflected that paradigm – Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and I even saw an ehical dimension to The Catcher in the Rye.

By the time I began high school and took a real history class, I was learning just how real that paradigm is in the world. I learned about the Native Americans and what befell them at the hands of European settlers. I learned about how the descendents of those European settlers were in turn oppressed under the tyranny of King George III.

I read about Paul Revere, Tom Paine, and how Americans began an armed insurgency against British forces – an insurgency we now celebrate as the American revolutionary war. As a kid I even went on school field trips just blocks away from where we sit now. I learned about Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, John Brown, and the fight against slavery in this country. I learned about Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, and the struggles of the labor unions, working class, and poor. I learned about Anne Frank, the Nazis, and how they persecuted minorities and imprisoned dissidents. I learned about Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King,and the civil rights struggle.

I learned about Ho Chi Minh, and how the Vietnamese fought for decades to liberate themselves from one invader after another. I learned about Nelson Mandela and the fight against apartheid in South Africa. Everything I learned in those years confirmed what I was beginning to learn when I was six: that throughout history, there has been a constant struggle between the oppressed and their oppressors. With each struggle I learned about, I found myself consistently siding with the oppressed, and consistently respecting those who stepped up to defend them -regardless of nationality, regardless of religion. And I never threw my class notes away. As I stand here speaking, they are in a neat pile in my bedroom closet at home.

From all the historical figures I learned about, one stood out above the rest. I was impressed be many things about Malcolm X, but above all, I was fascinated by the idea of transformation, his transformation. I don’t know if you’ve seen the movie “X” by Spike Lee, it’s over three and a half hours long, and the Malcolm at the beginning is different from the Malcolm at the end. He starts off as an illiterate criminal, but ends up a husband, a father, a protective and eloquent leader for his people, a disciplined Muslim performing the Hajj in Makkah, and finally, a martyr. Malcolm’s life taught me that Islam is not something inherited; it’s not a culture or ethnicity. It’s a way of life, a state of mind anyone can choose no matter where they come from or how they were raised.

This led me to look deeper into Islam, and I was hooked. I was just a teenager, but Islam answered the question that the greatest scientific minds were clueless about, the question that drives the rich & famous to depression and suicide from being unable to answer: what is the purpose of life? Why do we exist in this Universe? But it also answered the question of how we’re supposed to exist. And since there’s no hierarchy or priesthood, I could directly and immediately begin digging into the texts of the Qur’an and the teachings of Prophet Muhammad, to begin the journey of understanding what this was all about, the implications of Islam for me as a human being, as an individual, for the people around me, for the world; and the more I learned, the more I valued Islam like a piece of gold. This was when I was a teen, but even today, despite the pressures of the last few years, I stand here before you, and everyone else in this courtroom, as a very proud Muslim.

With that, my attention turned to what was happening to other Muslims in different parts of the world. And everywhere I looked, I saw the powers that be trying to destroy what I loved. I learned what the Soviets had done to the Muslims of Afghanistan. I learned what the Serbs had done to the Muslims of Bosnia. I learned what the Russians were doing to the Muslims of Chechnya. I learned what Israel had done in Lebanon – and what it continues to do in Palestine – with the full backing of the United States. And I learned what America itself was doing to Muslims. I learned about the Gulf War, and the depleted uranium bombs that killed thousands and caused cancer rates to skyrocket across Iraq.

I learned about the American-led sanctions that prevented food, medicine, and medical equipment from entering Iraq, and how – according to the United Nations – over half a million children perished as a result. I remember a clip from a ’60 Minutes‘ interview of Madeline Albright where she expressed her view that these dead children were “worth it.” I watched on September 11th as a group of people felt driven to hijack airplanes and fly them into buildings from their outrage at the deaths of these children. I watched as America then attacked and invaded Iraq directly. I saw the effects of ‘Shock & Awe’ in the opening day of the invasion – the children in hospital wards with shrapnel from American missiles sticking but of their foreheads (of course, none of this was shown on CNN).

I learned about the town of Haditha, where 24 Muslims – including a 76-year old man in a wheelchair, women, and even toddlers – were shot up and blown up in their bedclothes as the slept by US Marines. I learned about Abeer al-Janabi, a fourteen-year old Iraqi girl gang-raped by five American soldiers, who then shot her and her family in the head, then set fire to their corpses. I just want to point out, as you can see, Muslim women don’t even show their hair to unrelated men. So try to imagine this young girl from a conservative village with her dress torn off, being sexually assaulted by not one, not two, not three, not four, but five soldiers. Even today, as I sit in my jail cell, I read about the drone strikes which continue to kill Muslims daily in places like Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen. Just last month, we all heard about the seventeen Afghan Muslims – mostly mothers and their kids – shot to death by an American soldier, who also set fire to their corpses.

These are just the stories that make it to the headlines, but one of the first concepts I learned in Islam is that of loyalty, of brotherhood – that each Muslim woman is my sister, each man is my brother, and together, we are one large body who must protect each other. In other words, I couldn’t see these things beings done to my brothers & sisters – including by America – and remain neutral. My sympathy for the oppressed continued, but was now more personal, as was my respect for those defending them.

I mentioned Paul Revere – when he went on his midnight ride, it was for the purpose of warning the people that the British were marching to Lexington to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock, then on to Concord to confiscate the weapons stored there by the Minuteman. By the time they got to Concord, they found the Minuteman waiting for them, weapons in hand. They fired at the British, fought them, and beat them. From that battle came the American Revolution. There’s an Arabic word to describe what those Minutemen did that day. That word is: JIHAD, and this is what my trial was about.

All those videos and translations and childish bickering over ‘Oh, he translated this paragraph’ and ‘Oh, he edited that sentence,’ and all those exhibits revolved around a single issue: Muslims who were defending themselves against American soldiers doing to them exactly what the British did to America. It was made crystal clear at trial that I never, ever plotted to “kill Americans” at shopping malls or whatever the story was. The government’s own witnesses contradicted this claim, and we put expert after expert up on that stand, who spent hours dissecting my every written word, who explained my beliefs. Further, when I was free, the government sent an undercover agent to prod me into one of their little “terror plots,” but I refused to participate. Mysteriously, however, the jury never heard this.

YMD May 2012

So, this trial was not about my position on Muslims killing American civilians. It was about my position on Americans killing Muslim civilians, which is that Muslims should defend their lands from foreign invaders – Soviets, Americans, or Martians. This is what I believe. It’s what I’ve always believed, and what I will always believe. This is not terrorism, and it’s not extremism. It’s what the arrows on that seal above your head represent: defense of the homeland. So, I disagree with my lawyers when they say that you don’t have to agree with my beliefs – no. Anyone with commonsense and humanity has no choice but to agree with me. If someone breaks into your home to rob you and harm your family, logic dictates that you do whatever it takes to expel that invader from your home.

But when that home is a Muslim land, and that invader is the US military, for some reason the standards suddenly change. Common sense is renamed “terrorism” and the people defending themselves against those who come to kill them from across the ocean become “the terrorists” who are “killing Americans.” The mentality that America was victimized with when British soldiers walked these streets 2 ½ centuries ago is the same mentality Muslims are victimized by as American soldiers walk their streets today. It’s the mentality of colonialism.

When Sgt. Bales shot those Afghans to death last month, all of the focus in the media was on him-his life, his stress, his PTSD, the mortgage on his home-as if he was the victim. Very little sympathy was expressed for the people he actually killed, as if they’re not real, they’re not humans. Unfortunately, this mentality trickles down to everyone in society, whether or not they realize it. Even with my lawyers, it took nearly two years of discussing, explaining, and clarifying before they were finally able to think outside the box and at least ostensibly accept the logic in what I was saying. Two years! If it took that long for people so intelligent, whose job it is to defend me, to de-program themselves, then to throw me in front of a randomly selected jury under the premise that they’re my “impartial peers,” I mean, come on. I wasn’t tried before a jury of my peers because with the mentality gripping America today, I have no peers. Counting on this fact, the government prosecuted me – not because they needed to, but simply because they could.

I learned one more thing in history class: America has historically supported the most unjust policies against its minorities – practices that were even protected by the law – only to look back later and ask: ‘what were we thinking?’ Slavery, Jim Crow, the internment of the Japanese during World War II – each was widely accepted by American society, each was defended by the Supreme Court. But as time passed and America changed, both people and courts looked back and asked ‘What were we thinking?’ Nelson Mandela was considered a terrorist by the South African government, and given a life sentence. But time passed, the world changed, they realized how oppressive their policies were, that it was not he who was the terrorist, and they released him from prison. He even became president. So, everything is subjective – even this whole business of “terrorism” and who is a “terrorist.” It all depends on the time and place and who the superpower happens to be at the moment.

In your eyes, I’m a terrorist, and it’s perfectly reasonable that I be standing here in an orange jumpsuit. But one day, America will change and people will recognize this day for what it is. They will look at how hundreds of thousands of Muslims were killed and maimed by the US military in foreign countries, yet somehow I’m the one going to prison for “conspiring to kill and maim” in those countries – because I support the Mujahidin defending those people. They will look back on how the government spent millions of dollars to imprison me as a “terrorist,” yet if we were to somehow bring Abeer al-Janabi back to life in the moment she was being gang-raped by your soldiers, to put her on that witness stand and ask her who the “terrorists” are, she sure wouldn’t be pointing at me.

The government says that I was obsessed with violence, obsessed with “killing Americans.” But, as a Muslim living in these times, I can think of a lie no more ironic.

-Tarek  Mehanna
4/12/12

This is not an article with which I would’ve wanted to start my journey towards what I am planning to, but Tarek Mehanna is not just a voice of an individual muslim. It needs to be understood. This is not a single incident; It happens everywhere. It has happened with us Indians too. It is a voice of millions this Tarek Mehanna.

Siddiqui F.

(29.06.2012)

3 thoughts on “The Real Criminals in the Tarek Mehanna case

  1. Aamil says:

    Violence is not the answer to violence. By driving a plane into the WTC, the so called Mujahideen were ONLY playing into the hands of the imperialists. State actors have to be responsible and act so that their people are defended. You don’t rebel or irk a country that is 10 times bigger and as many times more powerful than you! Chanakya had once mentioned that a tree that stands upright in the face of s storm will be duly uprooted. That is what is happening in the countries invaded by the USA.

    Rebellion is a very romantic and noble notion. However, rebellion without the necessary resources to carry it out successfully is suicidal, check out the uprising of 1857 to get a fair idea.

    Sometimes, diplomacy is the best way out of a tight situation. Unfortunately, the Mujahideen are too egoistic a lot to understand this, despite the fact that they have their hands stained by the blood of innocents as much as the imperialist scum that they so despise.

    Also, what is the deal with Israel’s “Illegal” occupation of Palestine? By what standards are you calling that “Illegal”? Stop with such childish displays of outrage over the occupation of a worthless, arid and inhospitable piece of land. China also occupies a major portion of Arunachal Pradesh and Kashmir, supposedly larger than Palestine. You don’t see Indians going and bombing China for the same! However, there are diplomatic talks and India is trying to use international pressure tactics to get back the parts occupied by China.

    The barbaric policy of the Mujahideen to inflict fear into the minds of the people is what has led to the sad state of the Middle Eastern nations. When will they learn that fear tactics don’t work against the most powerful nations of the world and polite diplomacy is the only way out? I guess never.

    • Eloquent!

      So what is diplomacy according to you? Is it accepting whatever crap someone more powerful is doing to you and stooping so that they can walk all over you? Or, is it a few leaders selling their souls thereby giving the powerful the total control of their lands and, hence, reducing the value of humans to mere cattle?

      I agree that its not the “smart” thing to do but I’m not going to be puritanical and say that they weren’t expecting a reaction to one of the many things they did. It was an American who said that the incident of 9/11 was a case of Chickens coming home to roost!!! But of course The New York times wouldn’t accept nor would they print anything like this if not with a cynical tone so I wouldn’t be shocked with disagreement.

      You say you don’t rebel and irk someone who is so much more powerful. Agreed. But this is not a chemical equation we’re forming here. We’re talking of people. So if people don’t stand up and change the way things are going its never going to change. Fidel Castro hates the American imperialistic tendencies. But have you heard of Cuban crises in the near past? Hugo Chavez is branded a terrorist by the Americans but do the locals say so. No! Only the main stream media prints it and some people imprint themselves upon it and seem to consider it as an intellectual education.

      Diplomacy. The Gulf war was an ideological war? No. It was oil. Iraq was a terrorist state with Saddam Hussein hoarding “weapons of mass destruction”? No.

      Do you really believe that diplomacy is something that can be construed as a weapon against powerful states, as you mention many times with such loving caresses, that see no reason?

      But then I forget myself. Your reasons are nothing that I don’t read in the newspaper everyday. You need not repeat.

      I will agree that the Talibans had it figured out wrong. If only you agree that the Americans and the Soviets made them what they were.

      And I hope you give yourself some time and think about how you have slighted away the entire nations tears into a parable where you call it “worthless, arid and inhospitable”! If it is then why the fuck are the Zionists are occupying it. Oh yeah I know. You don’t think its illegal.

      You’re calling the same act that would warrant a tag of a terrorist if done by another nation “a childish display of outrage”!!! You lost me there Aamil. There IS no hope. I swear! Please read Edward Said. He’s considered an authority on the Palestinian issue. But then you wouldn’t agree because he doesn’t agree with what The Wall Street says.

      History lessons come cheap on the net Aamil.

      I know America is big and powerful. What I had heard and still believe in, although it is old fashioned and not practical, you might say, is that the powerful is the one responsible to its lesser brothers. But I’ve also heard that Men are greedy.

      On second thoughts I shouldn’t’ve written so much because the base upon which you build your castles are the ones I hope to annihilate. My base is a practical idea because its based on brotherhood and fealty.

      But then brotherhood and fealty means nothing if we only believe in ratified ideals. So called ideals. Ratified by the very people who made them.

      And, mate, if there was no 1857, there wouldn’t’ve been a 1947!

  2. Asim says:

    The man has stated some bare facts here which shouldn’t be negated simply by providing general views on terrorism (which is abundant thanks to the western media).
    Aamil, if you really want answers all you have to do is look for it. No point in having another useless and long debate. Especially your views on Palestine boggles my mind. Do you think Palestinians haven’t tried diplomacy? You cannot negotiate with superpowers. Israel continues to expand its territory by establishing settlements within Palestine lands. Are you simply saying that Palestinians should simply give up their home because you think it is arid and worthless? So where should they go and who will take them?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israeli_settlement

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